DENDROLOGY WEB PAGE ASSIGNMENT:

  1. Celtis occidentalis. Commonly known as the: American Hackberry
    1. Leaf Arrangement: Alternating
    2. Complexity: Pinnately Compounded
    3. Other Distinguishable Features: Blueberry sized small brown fruits present
    4. Site Location: Apartment Parking Lot
    5. Habitat: Wooded and open areas
    6. Fun Fact: These trees are extremely pollution tolerant; they thrive on smog and dirty water runoff from cities. (http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/hackberry)
  2. Alnus glutinosa. Commonly known as the: European Black Alder
    1. Leaf Arrangement: Alternating
    2. Complexity: Simple
    3. Other Distinguishable Features: Waxy film coverage of leaves, less elliptical/more rounded leaf shape.
    4. Site Location: Apartment Parking Lot
    5. Habitat: Variety of harsh conditional areas; poor or dry soils, flood plains and ditches.
    6. Fun Fact: Mainly used for erosion control and ornamental appeal. (http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/alder)
  3. Platanus occidentalis. Commonly known as: An American Sycamore
    1. Leaf Arrangement: Alternating
    2. Complexity: Palmately Compounded
    3. Other Distinguishable Features:
    4. Site Location: Near Mirror Lake
    5. Habitat: Prefer fertile, moist and well-drained soil. Grow to full potential in full sun
    6. Fun Fact: Wood of sycamore is used in the industry of furniture, musical instruments, kitchenware and butchers’ blocks (http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/sycamore_tree_facts/1209/)
  4.  Ostrya virginiana. Commonly known as: American Hophornbeam
    1. Leaf Arrangement: Alternating
    2. Complexity: Simple
    3. Other Distinguishable Features: Seed pods hanging in clusters
    4. Site Location: Outside of Jennings Hall
    5. Habitat: Sunny fields or under canopies of large forest trees.
    6. Fun Fact: Both male and female flowers are borne on the same tree, but as separate flowers (http://www.museum.state.il.us/muslink/forest/htmls/trees/O-virginiana.html)
  5. Liriodendron tulipifera. Commonly known as: Tulip Tree
    1. Leaf Arrangement: Alternating
    2. Complexity: Simple
    3. Other Distinguishable Features: Large blossoming flowers in summer months
    4. Site Location: OSU Oval
    5. Habitat: Moist and rich soils. Most commonly found in moist wetlands and edges of fields.
    6. Fun Fact: Tallest tree in the eastern forest  achieved by its straight trunk. (http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/tuliptree)
  6.  Acer griseum. Commonly known as: Paperbark maple
    1. Leaf Arrangement: Opposite
    2. Complexity: Palmately Compounded
    3. Other Distinguishable Features: Seeds contain wings and are connected in pairs
    4. Site Location: Near Tuttle Park Garage
    5. Habitat: Grows in a variety of soils and climates; commonly found in bottomlands and urban areas.
    6. Fun Fact: This tree grows more slowly than many maples, so it will take years to reach this height (https://www.thespruce.com/growing-the-paperbark-maple-acer-griseum-3269319)
  7.  Ulmus. Commonly known as: American Elm
    1. Leaf Arrangement: Alternating
    2. Complexity: Pinnately Compounded
    3. Other Distinguishable Features:
    4. Site Location: Near Tuttle Park Parking Garage
    5. Habitat: Understory tree found in woodlands and bottomlands.
    6. Fun Fact: Flowers appear on the trees before leaves, usually at the end of the winter or at the beginning of the spring (http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/elm_facts/1150/)
    7. Talked about in Gabriel Popkin’s article: “its limbs waving like Medusa’s snaky hair. The elm may grow along streets and sidewalks, but there is nothing tame about that tree. In cities, where animals feast on human gardens or garbage and most landscape plants are domesticated cultivars, native trees are the last truly wild beings.”
  8. Quercus imbricaria. Commonly known as: Shingle Oak
    1. Leaf Arrangement: Alternating
    2. Complexity: Simple
    3. Site Location: Near OSU ROTC building
    4. Habitat: Moist, well-drained, acidic soils, thrives in full sun to partial sun.
    5. Fun Fact: The common name comes from the early practice of making shingles from the wood (http://www.uky.edu/hort/Shingle-Oak)