INDIAN VILLAGE EDUCATIONAL CENTER:

LOCATION OF BOTANICAL SURVEY

THE SITE: 

This study site is slightly undeveloped. It is home to the Indian Village Outdoor Education Center. Many of the trails are used educationally and leisurely by both the children’s summer camps hosted at the education center, as well as the community. The location contains a natural creek that runs into the Scioto River as well as multiple small streams, waterfalls, and natural ponds that result in a diverse assortment of plant species in this location. The Indian Village Education Center is located at 40°2’19.896” N 83°4’30.2376” W, just 6.6 miles from OSU campus.

In the photo below, the marked location is the parking lot for the Indian Village Outdoor Education Center the natural trail environment that the survey was taken throughout was surrounding the location (indicated in red). Plants were chosen from three different plant communities; the Scioto River Bank, along the hiking trail, and within the deeper woods.

PLANTS OF INDIAN VILLAGE:

TREES:

  1. Staphylea trifolia. American Bladdernut. Native to Ohio. CC=6. Grows best in full sun, and in bloom from early spring to late summer. This tree is resistant to the toxic chemicals given off by the roots of the Black Walnut. Easily identified by its bladder-like paper seed capsules.

Source: “American Bladdernut.” American Bladdernut | The Morton Arboretum, https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/american-bladdernut.

2. Tilia Americana. American Basswood. Native to Ohio, found in the northern and western parts of the state. CC=6. Basswood trees are homes to many various songbird species because of the wide branching cover that they provide. In the past, Native Americans used the inner bark form young branches to make and weave rope, and the wood is used for soft wood projects; furniture, carvings, and toys.

Source: Wright, Jacob J. “Basswood Tree Facts.” Garden Guides, 12 Mar. 2019, https://www.gardenguides.com/116300-basswood-tree.html.

FROWERING/FRUITING PLANTS:

  1. Rudbeckia hirta. Black Eyed Susan. CC=1. A member of the Aster family. There are about 90 species of Black Eyed Susans in the eastern part of the United States. The flowers are often found in well drained or sandy soils, regrowth following fire events is common. Known to symbolize justice and encouragement in flowers. Native Americans had been known to use Black Eyed Susans to help in events of cold/flu, snake bites, infections, and earaches.

Source: “Black-Eyed Susan Facts.” Math, http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/blackeyed_susan_facts/2104/.

  1. Impatiens pallida. Pale Touch-Me-Not. CC=3. This flower is tube/cone shaped, and attaches from the side of the flower.

 SHRUBS/WOODY VINES:

  1. Rhus glabra. Smooth Sumac. Native to all parts of Ohio. CC=2. Rapid growing small tree/shrub that is able to survive through harsh winters, and hot, dry summers. Can assist greatly in erosion control.
  2. Rubus occidentalis. Black Raspberry. CC=1. Commonly found along roadside and hiking trails. Seed are normally distributed by birds and mammals. Twigs contain smooth bark with scattered spikes. Compared to the wild red raspberry bush, the Black Raspberry is larger with scattered spikes on the stem instead of hairy/sharp points.

Source: “Rubus Occidentalis (Black Raspberry).” Minnesota Wildflowers, https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/shrub/black-raspberry.

***POISON IVY***

Identification: Poison ivy consists of leaves of three with the middle leaf being larger that the two on either side of it. The two side leaves have thumb like points that stick out towards the stem of the plant During fall months, the color changes to a yellow or red, at this point the oil can still cause an allergy. Plants in the spring produce clusters of white berries that are very visible.

MOSS:  Anomodon attenuatus. Poodle moss. Found along the base of a tree.


LICHENS:

 

LIST OF SPECIES AT THE SITE (in absolutely no order)

  1. Rubus occidentalis.Black Raspberry. CC=1.
  2. Anomodon attenuates. Poodle Moss. CC=3.
  3. Juniperus virginiana. Eastern Red Cedar. Native to Ohio. CC=3.
  4. Acer saccharum. Sugar Maple. Native tree. CC=5.
  5. Rhus glabra. Smooth Sumac. Native to all parts of Ohio. CC=2.
  6. Conioselinum chinense. Chinese Hemlock Parsley. Native Flower. CC=8.
  7. Carum carvi. Caraway. No CC value determined.
  8. Daucus carota. Queen Anne’s Lace. No CC value given.
  9.  Actinomeris alternifolia. Wingstem. Native to Ohio. CC=5.
  10. Erigeron annuus. Daisy Fleabane. Native to Ohio, but weedy. CC=0.
  11. Cirsium pumilum. Pasture Thistle. Native to Ohio. CC=4.
  12. Rudbeckia hirta. Black Eyed Susan. CC=1.
  13.  Lobelia siphilitica. The Blue Cardinal Flower. CC=5.
  14. Cercis Canadensis. Redbud. Native to the entire eastern half of the US, includes Ohio. CC=3.
  15. Juglans nigra. Black Walnut. Native to Eastern, Midwestern, and the Great Plains of the US, includes Ohio. CC=5.
  16. Oenothera Biennis. Common Evening Primrose. Native to the Eastern US. CC=1.
  17. Dipsacus laciniatus. Cut Leaved Teasel. Not Native, introduced to much of the US, including Ohio. No CC value given.
  18. Polygala senegala. Seneca Snakeroot. Native in Ohio. CC=6.
  19. Asclepias syriaca. Common Milkweed. CC=1.

  20. Tilia Americana. American Basswood. Native to Ohio. CC=6. 

  21. Staphylea trifolia. American Bladdernut. Native to Ohio. CC=6.
  22. Impatiens pallida. Pale Touch-Me-Not. CC=3.
  23. Solidago gigantean. Tall Goldenrod. Native to North America, including Ohio. CC=4.
  24. Phlox divericata. Wild Blue Phlox. Native to Ohio. CC=4.
  25. Laportea canadensis.Wood Nettle. CC=5.
  26. Parthenocissus quinquefolia. Virginia Creeper. Native to Ohio. CC=2
  27. Fraxinus pennsylvanica. Green Ash. Native to Ohio. CC=3.
  28. Acer negundo. Box Elder. CC=3.
  29. Vitis riparia. Riverbank Grape. Native to Ohio. CC=3. 
  30. Maclura pomifera. Osage Orange. No CC Value
  31. Phytolacca americana. Pokeweed. CC=1.
  32. Acer saccharinum. Silver Maple. CC=3.
  33. Arctium minus. Common Burdock. Not Native to Ohio. No CC value given.
  34. Cichorium intybus. Chicory. Not Native to Ohio. No CC value given.
  35.  Symphyotrichum cordifolium. Broad-leaved Aster. CC=4.
  36. Lonicera maackii. Amur Honeysuckle. No CC Value.
  37. Barbarea vulgaris. Yellow Rocket. No CC value given.
  38. Thuidium delicatulum. Common Fern Moss. CC=3.
  39. Solidago canadensis. Canada Goldenrod. CC=1.
  40. Duchesnea indica. Mock Strawberry. CC=0.

 

LOW CC:

  1. Erigeron annuus. Daisy Fleabane. Native to Ohio, but weedy. CC=0. Commonly found bordering wood and roadsides. The plant has both hairy leaves and stems. Grow extensively along roadside and throughout waste lands. Common uses include various medicines for digestive ailments. Leaves are edible to humans, although not pleasurable to eat due to their hairy texture, and from the leaves a compound of caffeic acid can be extracted and used as a protecting agent for neuronal cells.
  2. Maclura pomifera. Osage Orange. No CC Value. It is commonly found in rural areas along fields and fence rows. The tree is pretty much pest and disease free. This was probably the easiest species to identify because of its large softball sized lime colored ball fruits, which pioneers had used to attract and poison houseflies.

 

HIGH CC:

  1. Tilia Americana. American Basswood. Native to Ohio. CC=6. Native Americans had used the sap for syrup. The leaves for soups and breads, and the fresh cut bark used to bandage wounds. Often planted ornamentally because of its wide spanning shade. The tree is also beneficial to the soil, as it enriches the soil by pulling up calcium and magnesium from deeper soils
  2. Staphylea trifolia. American Bladdernut. Native to Ohio. CC=6.Grows best in full sun, and in bloom from early spring to late summer. This tree is resistant to the toxic chemicals given off by the roots of the Black Walnut. Easily identified by its bladder-like paper seed capsules; these capsules release the seeds, which fall and spread through water.